Four Challenges of Inclusive Growth from the OECD’s chief economist

by Catherine L. Mann, Chief Economist and Head of the Economics Department, OECD The challenge of measuring inclusiveness. A standard metric for measuring inequality is the Gini coefficient, which measures income distribution within an economy. But there are many other measures, such as distribution of income deciles, distribution of wealth, distributions of these by regions … More Four Challenges of Inclusive Growth from the OECD’s chief economist

Continuing the reform process in France to improve job and income prospects

by Nicola Brandt and Pierre Guérin, France Desk, Country Studies Branch, OECD Economics Department Economic growth is strengthening in France, supported by consumption and investment, and the labour market is gradually recovering, as past reductions of comparatively high labour and business taxes are starting to take effect. However, GDP and employment growth are still lagging … More Continuing the reform process in France to improve job and income prospects

Where should Slovakia look for workers?

by Gabriel Machlica, Slovak Republic Desk, OECD Economics Department Slovakia’s economy continues to perform extremely well. More and more people are able to find jobs. Employment and hours worked are already at the highest since independence. The unemployment rate has fallen below historical norms. Nevertheless, more qualified people are needed. Difficulty in hiring qualified labour … More Where should Slovakia look for workers?

Global Economic Outlook: Better, but not good enough

By Catherine L. Mann, OECD Chief Economist and Head of Economics Department Global growth is projected to rise modestly from 3% in 2016 to just over 3½ per cent by 2018 in our latest Economic Outlook. The mood in the global economy has brightened during the past year, with confidence indicators and industrial production increasing, and … More Global Economic Outlook: Better, but not good enough

Employment ins and outs in OECD countries

By Paula Garda, OECD Economics Department Labour markets are in a continual state of flux. Workers get employed, leave a job and become unemployed, join the labour force or leave the labour force. The balance of these flows determines the overall employment rate. Analysing workers’ ins and outs of employment is critical to our understanding … More Employment ins and outs in OECD countries

Reducing poverty durably is a key challenge in Spain

By Yosuke Jin, Spain Desk, Country Studies Branch, OECD Economics Department Poverty has risen in Spain in the wake of the crisis (Figure 1), mainly due to lack of quality jobs that provide enough hours of paid work to support decent incomes (OECD, 2017). The risk of poverty is concentrated on jobless households and households … More Reducing poverty durably is a key challenge in Spain

Structural reforms can be inclusive; it all depends on the details

By Orsetta Causa,  Mikkel Hermansen and Nicolas Ruiz, Structural Surveillance Division, OECD Economics Department Structural reforms are regularly assessed based on their ability to boost GDP per capita. This emphasis relies on the assumption that higher GDP per capita is systematically associated with rising living standards for the vast majority of citizens. This view is … More Structural reforms can be inclusive; it all depends on the details

Coping with Creative Destruction: Reducing the Costs of Firm Exit

By  Dan Andrews, Head of Productivity Workstream, OECD Economics Department Creative destruction, the process through which a market economy replaces failing firms with successful ones, is a key driver of productivity growth. Reversing the current slowdown in productivity growth will therefore partly depend on structural reforms to recharge the engine of creative destruction. This will … More Coping with Creative Destruction: Reducing the Costs of Firm Exit

What do pro-competitive policies imply for workers?

By Boris Cournede, Senior Economist, Public Economics Division, OECD Economics Department Reforms that make economies more competitive have become a polarising subject. On one side, they are well established as a core staple of reform programmes: they are known to boost growth. On the opposite side, they often come up as lightning rods for criticism, … More What do pro-competitive policies imply for workers?

The gig economy will not abolish working 9 to 5

by Rory O’Farrell, Economics, OECD Economics Department Today’s post is also being published by the OECD Insights Blog There is little new about the ‘gig economy’. The word ‘gig’ originates from 1920s jazz musicians who played a small concert or ‘engagement’ at a venue. Dolly Parton may have sung about working 9 to 5, but … More The gig economy will not abolish working 9 to 5