Italy’s justice system has quite a long road ahead but already scores better – The Italian View

by the Italian Ministry of Economy and Finance – Pier Carlo Padoan, Italy’s Minister of Finance, was OECD Deputy Secretary-General and Chief Economist from 2009-2014). Italy’s justice system is gaining greater efficiency, thus gradually closing its paradoxical gap. On the one hand, the clearance rate (measured as the ratio of the number of resolved cases … More Italy’s justice system has quite a long road ahead but already scores better – The Italian View

The Italian banking system at a turning point – The Italian View

by the Italian Ministry of Economy and Finance, Pier Carlo Padoan, Italy’s Minister of finance, was OECD Deputy Secretary-General and Chief Economist from 2009-2014). The Italian banking system has long since been waiting for a comprehensive reform addressing structural inefficiencies and structural rigidities. As of 2014, the Government has defined a comprehensive reform plan while also tackling … More The Italian banking system at a turning point – The Italian View

The Narrow Path – The Italian View

by the Italian Ministry of Economy and Finance, Pier Carlo Padoan, Italy’s Minister of Finance, was OECD Deputy Secretary-General and Chief Economist from 2007-2014. Growth in Italy is taking place more slowly than in other Eurozone countries. Public debate about this fact offers several explanations but rarely juxtaposes long-period trends with recent policies. It is common … More The Narrow Path – The Italian View

Italy’s reforms are paying off but challenges remain

By Mauro Pisu, Head of Italy Desk, Country Studies Branch, OECD Economics Department Italy is recovering after a deep and long recession. Structural reforms, accommodative monetary and fiscal conditions, and low commodity prices have spearheaded the ongoing economic recovery. The Jobs Act and social security contributions’ exemptions jolted the labour market, leading to rising employment … More Italy’s reforms are paying off but challenges remain