Structural Inequality – The Case of Sweden

by Jon Pareliussen, Sweden Desk, OECD Economics Department Income equality is perceived by many as steadily embedded in Swedish society, as solid as a Volvo’s tyres firmly clinging to a narrow country road on a Småland’s bright midsummer night. However, the Gini coefficient has increased more in Sweden than in any other OECD country since the 1990s. But … More Structural Inequality – The Case of Sweden

Japan needs policies to boost productivity for inclusive growth

by Randall Jones, Head of Japan Desk, OECD Economics Department Labour productivity in Japan is about a quarter below the average of the top half of OECD countries (Figure 1), which is surprising given Japan’s outstanding performance in education and skills and high level of R&D spending. As in other countries, the labour productivity gap … More Japan needs policies to boost productivity for inclusive growth

The G20’s Enhanced Structural Reform Agenda: Some progress, but more reforms needed

by Agnès Cavaciuti, Tomasz Kozluk, Dorothée Rouzet, Nicolas Ruiz and William Witheridge, OECD Economics Department As G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors meet in Washington, there are signs that the growth prospects for their economies are improving. Recent indicators point to rising business confidence and industrial production in many countries, and fiscal initiatives in … More The G20’s Enhanced Structural Reform Agenda: Some progress, but more reforms needed

Reforming Brazil’s old-age pension system to ensure its sustainability

By Jens Arnold, Head of Brazil Desk at the OECD Economics Department and Hervé Boulhol, Head of Pensions and Population Ageing at the OECD’s Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Pensions have been successful in reducing old-age poverty well below the population-wide average, and below the OECD average (Figure 1). At present, all pension … More Reforming Brazil’s old-age pension system to ensure its sustainability

Employment ins and outs in OECD countries

By Paula Garda, OECD Economics Department Labour markets are in a continual state of flux. Workers get employed, leave a job and become unemployed, join the labour force or leave the labour force. The balance of these flows determines the overall employment rate. Analysing workers’ ins and outs of employment is critical to our understanding … More Employment ins and outs in OECD countries

Raising skills holds the key to higher living standards and well-being in Portugal

by Sonia Araujo, Country Studies Branch, OECD Economics Department For each hour worked Portugal produces about half of the output produced in the United States. A historic legacy of very low education attainment is partly to blame for Portugal’s lower productivity. However, education attainment remains low even for those who have left the education system … More Raising skills holds the key to higher living standards and well-being in Portugal

An immediate Chinese challenge: further addressing vast income inequality

by Ben Westmore, China Desk, OECD Economics Department The goal of the Chinese government to achieve a “moderately prosperous society in all respects” by 2020 is centred around improving social welfare throughout the population. One of the essential ingredients to doing this is a further reduction in economic inequality. As underlined in the OECD 2017 … More An immediate Chinese challenge: further addressing vast income inequality

Going for Growth 2017: Policies for growth to benefit all

by Alain De Serres and Nicolas Ruiz, Structural Surveillance Division, OECD Economics Department The support for governments’ pro-growth structural reform agenda is being undermined by the prolonged period of stagnating living standards that has affected a large share of the population in many countries.  Growing political headwinds are clearly one factor contributing to the steady … More Going for Growth 2017: Policies for growth to benefit all

Reducing poverty durably is a key challenge in Spain

By Yosuke Jin, Spain Desk, Country Studies Branch, OECD Economics Department Poverty has risen in Spain in the wake of the crisis (Figure 1), mainly due to lack of quality jobs that provide enough hours of paid work to support decent incomes (OECD, 2017). The risk of poverty is concentrated on jobless households and households … More Reducing poverty durably is a key challenge in Spain